Closed and Demolished Stockton Schools


351 East Vine Street Stockton High School was built in 1904, the school’s Anglo-Classic style main building was the first of a handful of structures to comprise the campus (one of which—the auditorium—still stands today). It was also Stockton’s only high school until 1942. Were it still here today along with the state hospital buildings, it would also fit perfectly into a university setting. Combined these buildings could have provided a stately campus for a UC or CSU (but probably not since I believe most state schools generally prefer new buildings). Stockton High School’s main building was condemned in 1966 and demolished a year later.

Closed and / or Demolished School Buildings

Disclaimer! Informational page only, I do not sell, lease or manage Commercial Real Estate. My business is limited to residential real estate only.

As early as 1933, because of California Earthquakes, the California legislature passed what was called the "Field Act" which sought to minimize earthquake danger to life and property by using certain basic construction standards. Prior to this time, school districts paid little attention to the perils of living in earthquake country. In 1966, The Stockton Unified School District hired an engineering company to check every school in the district. The result was complete condemnation of Burbank, El Dorado, Fair Oaks, Grunsky, Jackson, Jefferson, Lafayette, Lincoln, Munford, Schneider Vocational, Old Weber, New Weber and Woodrow Wilson. Other schools not totally condemned because of newer additions, only older sections were declared unsafe and abandoned included Hazelton, McKinley, Roosevelt, Stockton High and Victory. Exceptions are El Dorado, Schneider and Woodrow Wilson have been retained for related uses

August School - 3121 Waterloo Road August School- 3121 Waterloo Rd. The original one room schoolhouse was built in 1912 - The photo at the right was taken in 1950. The new August Elementary School is around the corner at 2101 Sutro Ave as shown in the left photo.

El Dorado School El Dorado School El Dorado School El Dorado School - 1525 Pacific Avenue & Harding Way - El Dorado School was originally the First North School located on at 225 North El Dorado Street at Vine.

Elmwood School - 840 South Cardinal Elmwood School - 840 South Cardinal Elmwood School - 840 South Cardinal Elmwood School  - 840 South Cardinal - Originally the Charity Dale District opened with a wooden schoolhouse in 1866. Photo is the front of a two room Elmwood School taken in the winter of 1920-21. The building was razed in 1954, although replaced by a new building in 1949. A wooden auxiliary building was divided into two classrooms located at the south end of the grounds. last used for storage.

Fair Oaks School - 2145 East Lafayette Fair Oaks School - 2145 East Lafayette Fair Oaks School - 2145 East Lafayette - The original school opened in 1899 and renovated in 1921. Post WWII photo of the totally renovated School (No longer a school at this location). Razed in 1971 after the opening of the Martin Luther King School five blocks to the east.

Franklin School - West side of Center between Washington and Lafayette Franklin School (Not to be confused with Franklin High School)- West side of Center between Washington and Lafayette - For a long time the board of education discussed the building of a schoolhouse and in August, 1858, they concluded that they had sufficient money and by a vote they selected a lot on Center and Washington streets as the location, and the 14th of October construction began. The building was in constant use up to 1900. It was a substantial building of brick, two stories high and containing two large rooms as well as cloak rooms, a model building for that time. With the completion of the building, the public schools were housed beneath a roof of their own. The joy of the event was considered worthy of a public demonstration. On February 25, 1859, the change to the new building was made amid much rejoicing, the boys to whom the good fortune fell of occupying the new building, marched to their new home  - Demolished. (No longer a school at this location)

Franklin School - West side of Center between Washington and Lafayette Fremont Grammar School(Not to be confused with Fremont Jr. High or Fremont Elementary) - Fremont and Aurora - 1892; W. R. Nauman principal; Miss Lottie Grunsky, Willis Lynch, Miss Carrie Q Berdine, Miss Ella Morris, Mrs. C . M. Bayley, and Miss Hattie Patterson, teachers; J. Sarles, janitor; seating capacity, (f) Kj 350; average attendance, 280. - The bell tower became the subject of much ridicule until it was removed in 1911. (No longer a school at this location)
Fremont Primary School - Fremont and Aurora Fremont Primary School- Fremont and Aurora (Not to be confused with Fremont Jr. High) - it was built to the north of the grammar school to accommodate the lower grades due to overcrowding in the large building. (No longer a school at this location)

Grant Elementary School - 1800 South Sutter Grant School - 1800 South Sutter - The original school was built in 1898 and gutted by fire in 1937 - The photo shown is the replacement school built in 1938

Lottie Grunsky Grammar School - 1601 E. Harding Way Lottie Grunsky Grammar School - 1601 E. Harding Way Lottie Grunsky Elementary School - 1550 School Street Grunsky Grammar School - 1601 East Harding Way - Opened in 1919 - North Street was extended east from Wilson Way to the front of the school - Originally they were calling the school the "North East primary School Two days before acceptance of final plans, the school board voted to name it Hewlett Hough School. Before the end of the month the name was officially changed to honor a well know Stocktonian, Miss Lottie F. Grunsky. She spent all of her adult life teaching in Stockton Schools. Demolished in 1977 - There is a new Grunsky School on this site today at 1550 School St.

Hazelton School 1031 S. Lincoln Street Hazelton School 1031 S. Lincoln Street Hazelton School - 1031 South Lincoln at Anderson Street The school faced East, fronting on Lincoln Street.- Completed in February of 1916 - 1973 photo. In 1976 this part was razed. Today, Hazelton School is around the corner at 535 W. Jefferson St.

Jackson School - 324 East Jackson Street Jackson School - 324 East Jackson Street Jackson School - 324 East Jackson Street Jackson School - 324 East Jackson Street

Jackson / South School - 324 East Jackson Street between. San Joaquin and Sutter; C. L. Neill, principal; Miss Maggie Meehan, Miss R. J. Jabor, Mrs Blanche Aaron, Miss Lottie Summerville, Miss Mary Gall and Mis'l Hattie D.mn, teacher; J. F. Moulton, janitor; seating capacity, 350; average attendance, 268; the library contains 709 volumes. - Students were transferred to the Burbank School Jackson School was Demolished in 1977


Jefferson School - 1121 E. Weber Jefferson School - 1121 E. Weber Jefferson School / High School Annex - 1121 E. Weber Avenue - Two separate sites and two different schools have carried the Jefferson School name. The first one opened in 1871 on the corner of Pilgrim and Weber Ave. In 1915 it was renovated and reopened as the "prevocational School" it had served as the district's vocational school for secondary grad pupils. It was renamed the Junior Trade School in 1933 and became the High School annex in 1948.  Demolished in 1974 and replaced by the "Golden Valley High School" in 1976
Jefferson School Number Two - 1425 East Lindsay Jefferson School Number Two - 1425 East Lindsay Jefferson School Number Two - 1425 East Lindsay Jefferson School Number Two - 1425 East Lindsay between Sierra Nevada and Wilson Way In 1915 a much larger Jefferson school was built - it was Declared unsafe under the provisions of the Field Act, and the school was officially closed at the end of the school year in June of 1977, but was temporarily reopened the following September to accommodate the Lottie Grunsky students until their school was completed in March of 1978. Demolished in 1979. (No longer a school at this location). A Bank of America Branch sits on the property today

301 E. Market Street, Lafayette School 301 E. Market Street, Lafayette School Lafayette School - 301 E. Market and San Joaquin NE Corner - The first Lafayette school was a four-room brick building which was erected on the site of the Academy building at a cost of $11,679. The total cost was $17,300, this including the fence, sidewalk, grading the play grounds, etc. This building had a large bell, which could be heard all over the city. It rested on a tower in a corner of the school yard, was made of pure copper, the donation of C. T. Meader, then known as the "copper king." The school was opened January 10, 1865, with four teachers in charge. (No longer a school at this location). First Presbyterian Church next to the school.

Second Lafayette School - 535 E. Church A new Lafayette School at 535 East Church was opened in 1912 which is often called the West School on online postcards. Along in the '90s four more rooms were added to the main building, largely increasing the amount of school room, decreasing at the same time the playground space, none too large at first. Before the dawn of the new century there was talk of removing the schools, as the noise of wagons, the blowing of whistles and the continuous smoke from the water works on Hunter Street made it a very disagreeable location for a school building. Some eight years ago it was sold to a building corporation for a commercial building. Photo posted by Terry Gust. (No longer a school at this location)


Lincoln Elementary School The Lincoln Elementary School was established in 1878 with twenty nine students and was a one-room country school, opened on the corner of an empty field five miles north of Stockton. It was located along Lower Sacramento Road, now Pacific Avenue just south of the present Lincoln Grammar School. Eight grades were taught. The school was in use until the late 1950s.

Lincoln School - 125 South Ophir Lincoln School (Not to be confused with The Lincoln School on Pacific Avenue) - 125 South Ophir (Now Airport Way)- 1977 photo - Former Vineyard School - Built January 7, 1895 - closed in 1966, demolished in 1977. (No longer a school at this location)

Luther Burbank School 1120 S. Pilgrim Luther Burbank School 1120 S. Pilgrim Luther Burbank School 1120 S. Pilgrim Luther Burbank School 1120 S. Pilgrim

Luther Burbank School - 1125 S. Pilgrim corner of Jackson - Opened in September, 1925. With 10 classrooms and a large basement, the student population remained consistent, so additions were never required. An attractive two story Elizabethan brick building. it was abandoned in 1978 and on November 15, 1978 it was sold to the Islamic Community of Stockton for $100,000. it served the Stockton Unified School District for 53 years. The building was added to the city register by resolution number 35,547 on August 28, 1978. (No longer a school at this location).

Built in 1925, A modified Elizabethan Tudor building, designed by the nationally influential local architectural firm of Allen & Young. Glazed tile ornamentation enhances the façade of the 10 classroom structure which served the Stockton Unified School District for 53 years


Mckinley School - 2411 S. McKinley (now El Dorado Street) Former McKinley School Mckinley & Ninth Street- Click to Enlarge Mckinley School - 2411 S. McKinley (now El Dorado Street) Mckinley School - 2411 S. McKinley (now El Dorado Street) McKinley School - 2411 S. Mckinley & Ninth Street - Built in 1922 - Demolished in 1974 - McKinley Elementary School is now around the corner at 30 W. 9th St - Center photo courtesy of Marilyn Gilmore

Monroe School 1135 S. Monroe Monroe School - 135 South Monroe at Washington Streets - Opened in January 1903 Photograph date: 1910 - A mission style single story building designed by San Francisco architect Louis S. Stone . Considered to be one of the most attractive school buildings in California. The school was closed in 1967. (No longer a school at this location)

Munford School - 1950 East Sonora Munford School - 1950 East Sonora Munford School - 1950 East Sonora at B Street - Built as the Stockton Day Nursery in 1927 and donated to Stockton Unified in 1944 by the Stockton Day Nursery Corporation - the school closed and was sold in 1971 and students and staff were transferred to the new Walton Development Center which adjoins the Stagg High School Campus. The building is still standing today and operates as "Casa Del Sol", a board and care home for the elderly. (No longer a school at this location)

North School - 1325 North El Dorado North School - 1325 North El Dorado North School - 1325 North El Dorado North School - A wooden building built in 1898 at 1325 North El Dorado, corner of Vine which replaced a one story structure It was called the "El Dorado" It was replaced in 1916 by the new El Dorado School at Pacific & Harding. The Presbyterian Church sits on the First El Dorado School site today. Miss Emma Debnam and Miss Lola Clayes, teachers; Mrs. Sommersett, janitor; seating capacity, .90; average attendance, 65.

Roosevelt School, 1922 - 3539 East Main Street Covert Martin photo Roosevelt School - 3529 East Main Street Roosevelt School - 3529 East Main Street Roosevelt School - 3529 East Main Street - 1921 date on the photo but construction did not start until August 1922. The school was not opened until 1923. The new address is 776 South Broadway Ave

Schnieder Vocational School

Former Schnieder Vocational School - 1144 East Channel Former Schnieder Vocational School - 1144 East Channel Former Schnieder Vocational School - 1144 East Channel Former Schnieder Vocational School - 1144 East Channel

Former Schnieder Vocational School - 1144 East Channel Former Schnieder Vocational School - 1144 East Channel - The last Stockton school completed before the passage of the "Field Act". it was also condemned. It is now the home of the District's School for Adults (Jane Frederick Continuation High School). This Part-Time High School began classes in the Stockton Record Building in 1919. The 1920-21 year was spent at the Realty Building west of the Market Street Post office, and then moved to 31 South Sutter before they moved to their own school in 1932

Former St. Agnes School and Convent - 640 N. San Joaquin Former St. Agnes School and Convent - 640 N. San Joaquin Former St. Agnes School and Convent - 640 N. San Joaquin Saint Mary's Assumption School & Assumption Convent - 620-640 N. San Joaquin St

Former St. Agnes School and Convent Today, The Stockton Unified Police Department - Built as a Catholic parochial school in 1914 the facility has been successively called the St. Agnes Academy, St. Agnes High School, and San Joaquin Middle School. The adjoining building constructed in 1920 served as a convent for the Dominican sisters. Neoclassic and late beaux-arts design highlight this yellow buff brick complex, arched porch and terra cotta capped pilasters. Located in the Magnolia Historic Preservation District. The building was added to the city register by resolution number 86-0503 on August 11, 1986.

St. Agnes Academy and Catholic Schools

The first Catholic school was on the corner of Sutter and Lafayette streets, St. Clair Lever was the teacher, however it failed for lack of students. In 1865 a second school was opened with Mary O'Donnell as teacher.

St. Agnes Academy - San Joaquin & Taylor St. Agnes Academy - San Joaquin & Taylor Subsequently the old Catholic Church was torn down to make room for a two-story brick building. It was erected on the church property facing San Joaquin Street and Taylor Streets and the building was used as a boys' school, with Weber hall in the north end of the second story. Eight years previous to the establishing of the Brother's school. Father O'Connor planned the establishing of a girls' academy, with Sisters of Charity in charge. Captain Weber was approached upon the subject and as he was then tearing down the old Corinthian building all the available lumber was hauled to the proposed site of the new academy building. A number of the Sisters were sent to Stockton, and they collected the necessary building fund, $20,000. The building was finished in due time and St. Agnes Academy was dedicated and consecrated March 17, 1876.

In 1884 a boys' school was contemplated, and at Father O'Connor's solicitation four Brothers came from Dayton, Ohio, to take charge of the Brother's school. In the meantime, the old Catholic church was remodeled and fitted up as a school and Brothers' residence and in August, 1884, it was dedicated and consecrated by Bishop Riordan.

The location of the school on the corner of San Joaquin and Taylor streets was quite satisfactory until 1896. when the Santa Fe Railroad built a depot across the street, and the constant ringing bells and blowing of whistles made it a very undesirable location either for a schoolroom or a place of residence for the Sisters. In 1913 a quarter of a block of land was purchased on the corner of San Joaquin and Park streets and a handsome school building was erected at a cost of $60,000. Later an adjoining building was erected, adjoining the school on the south as a residence for the Dominican Sisters, who had charge of the academy.

Stockton High School

Stockton High School North Building - West Wing
North Building - West Wing
Harding Way
Stockton High School North Building - East Wing
North Building East Wing
California & Harding
Stockton High School Gymnasium
Gymnasium
Facing California Street
Stockton High School Cafeteria Building
Cafeteria Building
Harding & San Joaquin
Stockton High School Cafeteria Building
Cafeteria Building
Harding & San Joaquin
Stockton High School Site of the Main Building
Site of the Main Building
Stockton High School 1949
Main Building
351 East Vine Street
Stockton High School Site of the Main Building
Main Building
Stockton High School Auditorium
Auditorium
Stockton High School Campus - 1929
Campus - 1929
Stockton High School Campus - 1929
Main Building
Victory School - 1121 Buena Vista - Designed by local architects Losekann and Clowdsley. This post World War One school was named for the Allied victory in 1918
Victory School - 1121 Buena Vista Victory School - 1121 Buena Vista Victory School - 1121 Buena Vista

Vineyard School - Corner of Market and Ophir Vineyard / Lincoln School - Corner of Market and Ophir - Opened February 14, 1870. In 1891 the building was sold to L. Mollenhauer who moved it to 348 South Aurora Street. Rebuilt as the Lincoln School in 1891 the New Lincoln school building was erected on the Vineyard district school site, corner Ophir and Market streets, the property having been given to the district trustees by Captain Weber way back in the early '70s.  (No longer a school at this location)

Washington School

Washington School Site Plaque - Inscription: Commemorative Plaque, First Stockton High School - This building housed the first high school organized in Stockton. According to records, the classes were opened to students January 10, 1870. Twenty eight pupils made up the new school. The faculty consisted of A.H. Randall, principal, and Mrs. A Loomis, assistant. The first graduating class consisted of Miss Lottie Grunsky, Miss Alice M. Mills and Mr. Edward Grunsky. These pupils received their high school diplomas December 23, 1870.

Washington School Marker Washington School - SE Corner of San Joaquin and Lindsay. The building faced San Joaquin. There was at this time 1,265 children entitled to school privileges, and only nine school rooms to accommodate them. There was another bond issue in 1867 of $15,000 and in December, 1869, the original Washington school building was erected. Occupying a quarter of a block two of the lots were donated by Captain Weber and two were purchased. The building cost $20,627 and the entire cost was $25,724. It was a four-room building, the high school occupying two of the second-story rooms. In 1891 a third story was erected to accommodate the increased attendance of the high school students, making it an eight-room building. The removal of the high school pupils to their own high school building gave increased room to the lower grades and a few years ago. For safety reasons the third story was torn off and the building remodeled as we see it here. The building later became the district's "Administration Center" The building was razed in 1958 following its purchase by the Bank of Stockton.

Washington School
Original Washington School - 1870
Washington School
Washington School with it's third floor addition in 1891
Washington School
For safety reasons the third story was removed and the building remodeled as we see it here
Washington School
Washington School Postcard
Old Weber School - 55 W. Flora Street Old Weber School - 55 W. Flora Street Old Weber School - 55 W. Flora Street Weber Primary School - 55 West Flora, corner of Commerce. Designed by Stockton Architect Charles Beasley, the plan was used for both the Franklin School on South Center and this building. Named in honor of Captain Charles Weber and opened on May 12, 1873. The seating capacity, 242; average attendance, 150. It's the oldest brick building in the city retaining its original appearance. The building was added to the city register by resolution number 29,100 on June 7, 1971. It is #73000445 on the National Register of Historic Places, and was added as the Old Weber School in 1973.

New Weber School - Madison and Park Streets New Weber School - Madison and Park Streets Weber School 701 N. Madison (The New Weber School) - Madison and Park Streets - Today its the Stockton Unified School District Administration Building, relocated here from the cramped facilities of the Washington School. Completed in April of 1915. In the mid 50s enrollment dropped to less than 250 students as the neighborhood aged and younger couples were buying homes in newer subdivisions

Woodrow Wilson / North School - 150 E. Mendocino Woodrow Wilson / North School - 150 E. Mendocino Woodrow Wilson / North School - 150 E. Mendocino Woodrow Wilson / North School - 150 East Mendocino - Originally named the North School which opened in a one room wooden building at on Mariposa Avenue in 1904.It was called various names such as "Little schoolhouse in the oaks, Annexed School, and North school. it took nine years for the school to get an official name. Pictured here is the subsequently renamed to Woodrow Wilson School when it first opened in the fall of 1912 at Mariposa and El Dorado. In 1922 eight additional rooms were added. In June 1977 the school was closed as being unsafe. In the fall of 1977, the Jack & Jill Cooperative Nursery School Building was moved from its El Dorado School site and reopened to preschool students in January of 1978. Left two photos Courtesy of Floyd Perry Jr.

Private Schools

Kindergarten School - On Lindsay between. Hunter and San Joaquin; Mr. E. M. Tureman, principal.
California & Channel - Stockton Business College California & Channel - Stockton Business College Stockton Business College and Normal Institute - SE Corner of California and Channel; W. C. Ramsey , principal, organized in 1875.

Catholic Schools

St. Mary's College - San Joaquin between Market and Washington · Brother George principal· Brothers of  Mary teachers

St. Joseph School - NE corner Grant and Fremont; Sister Evangelist, principal.

See also

Books

Stockton's Historic Schools - Robert Bonita - A brief photographic history of the public schools of Stockton which were built between 1853 and the passage of The Field Act in 1933. Photographs of these early schools, some long since razed in the name of progress along with the majority of others demolished in conformity with enforcement acts passed California Legislature in 1959 and 1968, make up a large portion of this book. A brief history of the development of Stockton school system precedes the body of the book for those interested in Stockton's pioneer beginnings

External links

 

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