Superintendents Mansion
Stockton State Hospital

Stockton Midtown Houses


Situated on tidewater the city enjoys exceptional facilities for shipping. Daily steamers ply between the port and San Francisco, a distance of 85 miles and four trans-continental railways passing through the city afford a continuous means of intercourse with the centers and markets of the whole country.

Stockton's streets are wide, well-kept thoroughfares, lined with magnificent shade trees, behind which cluster beautiful homes built upon mansion and cottage lines as the means of the owners have dictated, but contributing en masse, to the general adornment of the city. The streets are served with a score of miles of car lines run by electricity and which reach to every point of vantage and pleasure in the city.

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143 W. Acacia St - Swett-Moreing Home - The California Eastlake style (combination of Queen Anne and Eastlake) home was constructed for William Swett in 1883 by San Francisco architects Samuel and Joseph Newsom. Swett was a staff member at the Stockton Mail newspaper, and his family lived in the home until it was sold in 1891. Cyrus Moering Sr., a rancher and contractor, purchased the home 1898 and lived there until his death in 1911. Moering headed the firm of Cyrus Moreing & Sons, which held many of the largest construction contracts for the bond highways in San Joaquin County. Moering was also an elected councilman for the Second Ward, and owned a baseball team. The home is significant because it is one of the oldest surviving examples of the Newsoms' work, and retains an essentially original appearance. The home was added to the city register by resolution number 39,263 on July 26, 1982.
Click to Enlarge 207 W. Acacia St - Dr. Cross House - Built in 1890 in the popular Queen Anne style featuring polygonal bays and a corbelled chimney, this home was both an office plus the residence of Dr. Lester Emmett Cross. This local physician was considered to be Dean of Stockton's local medical profession and was affectionately labeled "Dr. Stork" as it was often said a child was not well born unless Dr. Cross delivered it. - Today it's a bed-and-breakfast known as the Old Victorian Inn - Stockton register #85-0597, September 23, 1985
Click to Enlarge 521 E. Acacia St. - Superintendent's Home Built in 1900  for the Stockton state hospital at a cost of $5,800. This 16 room home is an excellent example of a southern mansion. The state hospital was established in 1853 as the first publicly supported facility for the mentally ill in the west. Located in the Magnolia Historic Preservation District. National Register of Historic Places The home was added to the city register by resolution number 29,086 on June 1, 1971
Click to Enlarge Channel & Ophir (NW corner) - James Budd House - 1891 - Budd was born on May 18, 1851 in Janesville, Wisconsin. When he was seven years old, his family emigrated to the West, settling in Stockton in 1858. He attended local grammar and high schools before attending the University of California, Berkeley, where he was admitted to the Zeta Psi fraternity, graduating in 1873. Following his graduation, Budd returned to Stockton to study law, being admitted to the California Bar the following year. His public career in the courts began after being appointed the San Joaquin County deputy district attorney Budd was a member of the U.S. House of Representatives for the 2nd California district from 1883 to 1885, and later elected as the 19th Governor of California from 1895 until 1899. Home demolished
Click to Enlarge Click to Enlarge 345 W. Clay - Wong K. Gew Mansion - Designed by architect Peter Sala and constructed in a Classical Neo-Georgian style (1900-24) by Losekann & Clowdsley, the home was one of the most costly in Stockton by the time it was completed in 1921. Gew had arrived in New York in 1900, and moved to Stockton in 1910, operating gambling establishments and acting as a partner in the Lincoln Hotel and owner of the Tong King Company and other Stockton gambling establishments. At the time, city ordinance prohibited Chinese people from establishing homes north of Main Street, so Gew chose a large plot of land on Clay Street for his Southern-style home with twelve rooms (including two sleeping rooms for servants), a marble fireplace, Honduras mahogany, columns, classical windows, and a balcony. Gew is noted for breaking through several cultural and racial barriers, including hiring a Caucasian architect to design his home, as well as the fact that he was a well-respected Chinese businessman who had money, owned a car, and built an extravagant home outside of the area covered by the ordinance. The home is #78000761 on the National Register of Historic Places, and was added on September 20, 1978. It was added to the city register by resolution number 30,834 on November 5, 1973
Click to Enlarge El Dorado & Park - J.M. Kelsey house, not  Washington Trahearn House - no 1891 - George Washington Trahern, after leaving the Choctaw Academy, fought in the Mexican American War. He was given a land patent in California, and became a founding settler of what is now Stockton. He spent a brief time in Washington, D.C. before moving to California, and was evidently a great orator. None of his descendants are on the Dawes Rolls, nor did they apply. Nor did he claim his Choctaw heritage in a biography written in 1900
Click to Enlarge 705 North El Dorado - Emily Grohman House - Built in 1909 - Demolished
Click to Enlarge 901 El Dorado & Poplar - J.M Welsh Mansion - no 1891 - J. M Welsh, its first president of the  Stockton Land, Loan & Building association
Click to Enlarge El Dorado & Harding - Hillman Mansion - no 1891/1902 - This house was known as the Hillman/Rindge house and was at the southwest corner of North Street, (now Harding Way), and El Dorado Street. Built by Frank Hillman in 1905 and later owned for many years by Fred Rindge. It was one of many beautiful homes in the area that is now the Magnolia Historic District. Both Hillman and Rindge were farm land developers. This house had a sunken Roman bath and a ballroom on the third floor.
Click to Enlarge 347 E. Flora - R.E. Wilhoit House - 1902 City Directory - On this corner today is an ugly flat roof 10 unit apartment
Click to Enlarge Fremont & Center - Judge Daniel Terry - David S. Terry had a colorful background and gained much notoriety in other parts of the state as well as San Joaquin County between the time of his arrival in the Stockton area in 1849 and his death at Lathrop (at the hands of U.S. Deputy Marshal David Neagle in 1889
Click to Enlarge Fremont & Ophir - Judge Creanor House - no 1891/1902 - When the state was organized the legislature abolished the Mexican system of courts and established the system in use through the United States. The highest or district court included two or more counties, and the district court in this district included San Joaquin, Calaveras, Stanislaus, and Tuolumne counties. The first district judge was Charles M. Creanor, who was appointed by the Legislature. The district attorney was elected by the voters of each county
Click to Enlarge 5 E. Harding Way. Hurrle Weston Home - Known at one time as 'The White Queen of Stockton,' Built fin 1906 for Charles J. Hurrle, Stockton Glass Works manager. Sold in 1915 to Mrs. J. D. McDougald who bought it for her daughter, Carolyn Weston and son-in-law, Paul Weston, a local farmer and the second chairman of the Stockton port commission. The home has ten rooms at one time fronted the North Street Canal, which at the time was very North Stockton. Today it's the home of Maxine's Bridal Shop. Ron Chapman tells me the top floor is one complete open room. It was empty at the time he got to see it, sometime in the '90's. In the basement were stacks of marble that came from the Hazelton Library on Market St. Added to the Stockton city register resolution # 29,100, June 7, 1971,
Click to Enlarge 132 N. Hunter - Dr. C. L. De Vinney house - 1891 Directory. House is long gone
Click to Enlarge 206 North Hunter at Oak - Dr Asa Clark - 1891 - It was in 1861 that Dr. Clark came to Stockton to assume the duties as assistant physician for the State Insane Asylum, and since that time until his demise, his entire thought and study was given to those mentally afflicted. By arrangements with the authorities of Nevada, Drs. Langdon and Clark were entrusted with the care of the insane in the territory, then numbering about thirty, and all such other patients as should be committed to their care.
Click to Enlarge 817-823 North Hunter Street - Clara Stoltz home, From The Library of Congress:  4-unit apartment house is a contributor to the 1985 Magnolia Historic Preservation District. It is a typical craftsman design, but it was lacking in significant architectural character or an association with famous people or events that would make it eligible to the National Register of Historic Places. - Demolished
Click to Enlarge 833 N Hunter - Julie Umberger home
Click to Enlarge 940 North Hunter at Magnolia - Elizabeth Barnhart House - 1902
Click to Enlarge 1335 N. Hunter St - Dunne Home - Built in 1895 for local shoe store owner Edward Dunne, this design of the home combines elements of Queen Anne, Eastlake and Stick styles. It contains an array of original stain-glass windows. as Dunne's family grew, the home was expanded, by adding wings acquired from other local structures, perhaps the reason for the home's eclectic Victorian styles. This home has often been referred to as the Stockton 'Mystery House'. Stockton register #38,208, May 11, 1981
Click to Enlarge 820 N Madison St. - Edward B. Condy Home - Built in 1893. Former home of Edward B. Condy a popular band leader, editorialized as being Stockton's John Philip Sousa,. Condy brought honor to Stockton with his celebrated musical organizations. He fashioned the legendary Stockton Boys band during 1900 and went on in 1927 to create the Stockton City band. Stockton city register # 34,112, May 9, 1977
Click to Enlarge Click to Enlarge 205 E. Magnolia “Knox-Baxter-Sullivan Mansion” (1910). Built by Lee A. Phillips, and designed by Edgar B. Brown, who is also known for designing the Stockton Hotel (1910) and the Children’s Home of Stockton (1912). This Craftsman style, shingle bungalow has been home for many prominent Stocktonians. Notice the old carriage house down the alley.
Click to Enlarge 189 East Oak Street - Andrew Simpson House - 1891 - Andrew W. Simpson served as a Bank of Stockton Vice President for 54 years, from 1867 to 1921. Born in Brunswick, Maine, on July 15, 1831, he came to Stockton in November 1851, securing work in the lumber business with his brother, Asa. Commerce, Main, Madison and Weber Avenue bound the main yard of his lumber business. A W. Simpson was a member of the Weber Fire Engine Company as well. In 1888, he was a delegate to the Republican National Convention in Chicago
Click to Enlarge 548 E. Park St. - Benjamin Holt Home - Built in 1860, Historic Register Number 198200254. Benjamin Brown, father-in-law of Benjamin Holt built this home in 1869 using a Greek Revival style. Tall windows, soaring peaks, and a square frame are qualities of the home, which was unique in an era when the majority of homes were constructed in a Gothic style. The lower floor featured numerous small rooms that could be used for guests and entertaining; the main floor featured a kitchen, while the second floor also included a small kitchen and a number of small rooms connected off a long hallway. During the time the well-known invention of Holt's, his home was pretty secluded and encompassed a whole city block, his nearest neighbors were a brewery along with the insane asylum off of North American Street. Benjamin Brown, father-in- law of Benjamin Holt built this home in 1869 using a Greek Revival style. Tall windows, soaring peaks, and a square frame are qualities of the home, which was unique in an era when the majority of homes were constructed in a Gothic style. The lower floor featured numerous small rooms that could be used for guests and entertaining; the main floor featured a kitchen, while the second floor also included a small kitchen and a number of small rooms connected off a long hallway. During the time the well-known invention of Holt's, his home was pretty secluded and encompassed a whole city block, his nearest neighbors were a brewery along with the insane asylum off of North American Street. A native of New Hampshire,
Click to Enlarge 144 E Poplar - Mary Pache home
1106 N. San Joaquin “Buck House” (1892). Built for Judge George Buck. A beauty in its day, this house displays many of the characteristics of the Queen Anne style house.
Click to Enlarge 1107 N. San Joaquin St - Newell Home -Located in the Magnolia Historic Preservation District. This Queen Anne style home was built for Sidney Newell, a banker for Stockton Savings Bank as well as a steamboat company executive, and his wife Anna Elizabeth (Upslone). The Samuel and Joseph Newsom design features a hipped gable roof with a corbelled chimney on the south side (with a bargeboard, pendant, and vents), turned posts, delicate woodwork, and a stained glass window in the entry. The home was added to the city register by resolution number 29,170 on July 6, 1971.
Click to Enlarge 1119 N. San Joaquin St- Charles E. Owen Home - In the Magnolia Historic Preservation District. The two-and-a-half story Queen Anne style home was constructed for Charles Owen next to the home of the man who conveyed him the deed. Built at a cost of $10,000, it was completed in February 1890. It was sold in 1909 to William Brennan, owner of a leading livery stable. The home features a gabled roof with boxed eaves, lights, and shingles in the gables, bay windows with double-hung sashes, and wooden steps to the porch. It also has a hitching post in the front yard, one of the few left in Stockton. Owen was an accomplished musician, and had composed pieces that were published in San Francisco and Boston. The home is remarkable for its craftsmanship, as well as the quick construction timeline, remarkable for the 1890s. It was added to the city register by resolution number 34,629 on November 7, 1977
1120 N. San Joaquin “Levy House” (1893). Built for Max Levy, a prominent merchant, this Queen Anne displays turned posts, spool and spindle work, eyelid dormer and connected witches cap and finial.
Click to Enlarge 921 S. San Joaquin- Moses Rodgers Home - The San Francisco-style home, with its bay window, tongue and groove siding, and wrap-around porch, was constructed for Missouri native - and African-American - Moses Rogers. Rogers was born a slave, but became a mining engineer and came to California for the Gold Rush in 1848. He quickly became known as an expert in the state, and investors went to him for advice regarding mining claims. Rogers moved his family to Stockton so that his five daughters would receive a good education, something that the schools were able to provide. The home is notable because of its architectural style, as well as the fact that it was owned by an African- American family. It is #78000763 on the National Register of Historic Places and was listed in 1978. It was added to the city register by resolution number 35,546 August 28, 1978
Click to Enlarge Click to Enlarge Click to Enlarge 704 N. Stockton St.- Wong House - Built in 1924 This classical Neo-Georgian style residence was designed by architect Peter L. Sala for Wong Kee Quen. Born in China, Wong made his fortune in New York City and in 1912 started the operation of several local gambling establishments. He was a principal partner in the construction of the elegant Lincoln Hotel, formed a Chinese language school and was a Wong family association director. The home was added to the city register by resolution number 38,553 on September 8, 1981.
Click to Enlarge 146 North Sutter- Captain J.W. Smith House - Captain Smith, was the manager of the steamboat office in Stockton. Captain Smith along with James Addison Crow Dr. Sposatti, James Crow built the fist street railroad in Stockton. It was a horse car line then.
Click to Enlarge Weber Point - Captain Weber House - Captain Charles M. Weber, the father of the city of Stockton, was born February 16, 1814, in Hombourg, department of Mont Tonnerre. The prime of his life was kept in tasteful style. In 1860, the eminent traveler and writer, Bayard Taylor, says: “We were greatly delighted with our visit to Captain Weber, who has transformed a tract of land between the two arms of the slough into a garden. There is no more delightful villa in existence. A thick hedge, outside of which is a row of semi-tropical trees, surrounds the peninsula. The gate opens into a lofty avenue of trellis work, where the sunshine strikes through pulpy branches of amethyst and chrysolite, while on either hand beds of royal roses of every hue fill the air with odor. Captain C. M. Weber died May 4, 1881, of pneumonia. The funeral was conducted with the impressive ceremonies of the Catholic church, by Archbishop Alemany, of San Francisco.

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