Stockton California Buildings on National, State and City Registers


Disclaimer! Informational page only, I do not sell, lease or manage Commercial Real Estate.

Stockton has many historical buildings and sites, including several included on the National Register of Historic Places, California Historical Landmark list along with the City of Stockton Register.

Click any thumbnail and it becomes a slideshow where you can then scroll through the slides. Or select Auto Play or use the mouse or keyboard arrow keys to scroll through all images

Click to Enlarge Click to Enlarge B&M Building - 25 Bridge Place.
Constructed sometime during the 1860s and 1870s. More about the B&M building

B&M Building - 25 Bridge Place

This building which is located close to the head of Stockton's Deepwater Channel, bring to mind memories of bygone commerce when Stockton functioned as the primary depot supplying the Mother Lode gold mines. Featuring hints of Italianate styling, the building is abundant with history going back to the California Gold Rush Era. The name B & M was created during the 1930s for the then owners of the building Joseph Breidenbach & Alexander McDonald. The structure was added to the City of Stockton register by resolution number 40,069, August 29, 1983.
Click to Enlarge Benjamin Holt Home - 548 E. Park St. Historic Register Number 198200254. Benjamin Brown, father-in-law of Benjamin Holt built this home in 1869 using a Greek Revival style. Tall windows, soaring peaks, and a square frame are qualities of the home, which was unique in an era when the majority of homes were constructed in a Gothic style. More about Ben_Holt

Benjamin Holt Home - 548 E. Park St.

The lower floor featured numerous small rooms that could be used for guests and entertaining; the main floor featured a kitchen, while the second floor also included a small kitchen and a number of small rooms connected off a long hallway. During the time the well-known invention of Holt's, his home was pretty secluded and encompassed a whole city block, his nearest neighbors were a brewery along with the insane asylum off of North American Street. Benjamin Brown, father-in-law of Benjamin Holt built this home in 1869 using a Greek Revival style. Tall windows, soaring peaks, and a square frame are qualities of the home, which was unique in an era when the majority of homes were constructed in a Gothic style. The lower floor featured numerous small rooms that could be used for guests and entertaining; the main floor featured a kitchen, while the second floor also included a small kitchen and a number of small rooms connected off a long hallway. During the time the well-known invention of Holt's, his home was pretty secluded and encompassed a whole city block, his nearest neighbors were a brewery along with the insane asylum off of North American Street. A native of New Hampshire,

Holt along with his brothers had formed a wagon wheel and spoke business, they opened on the west coast as they relocated to Stockton during 1883. Their new Stockton Wheel Company built both metal and wooden wheels, which mostly were for streetcars. In 1892, they renamed the company the "Holt Manufacturing Company", relocated to Aurora Street, thus subsequently became a part of the initial large businesses that brought recognition to Stockton. The Holt company also manufactured the Combined Harvester, a large farming implement resembling a tractor that requited 26 mules or horses to pull it, and eventually marketed it throughout the U. S. and the balance of the world. Beginning in November of 1909, the company manufactured and marketed a Caterpillar type track tractor, the design subsequently influenced the engineering of armored tanks. The Holt home became an addition to the Stockton city register by city resolution # 29,100 , June 7, 1971. The site is also #82002254 on the National Register of Historic Places, added March 2, 1982.. it is currently home to the the San Joaquin County Health Care Services Agency Martin Gipson Center Mental Health Division

Click to Enlarge Children's Home of Stockton - 430 N. Pilgrim St - Built in 1912. Architect Edgar B. Brown, designed this structure. he also designed the Stockton Hotel in 1910. He designed the Knox-Baxter-Sullivan Mansion located at 205 E. Magnolia St. in 1910. The structure was added by resolution No. 99-0312, to the city of Stockton register June 22, 1999
Click to Enlarge City Hall - 425 N El Dorado St. It houses the offices of the Mayor, the City Manager, the Council chambers, and the city administrative offices, the stone and marble Grecian-Iconic style building was first occupied in 1926. The lobby in the building offers a coffered ceiling along with decorative bronze electroliers. The structure was added by resolution No. 39,656 to the city historic register, March 14, 1983.
Cole's Five Cypress Farm. 11221 E Eight Mile Rd. Constructed in Italianate and Greek Revival styles (1850-1924) by Joseph H. Cole, the home is #88000578 on the National Register of Historic Places, and was added on May 25, 1988. Also known as Parker Place, the home is currently a private dwelling.
Click to Enlarge Commercial & Savings Bank - 343 E Main St. A Beaux Arts-Renaissance Revival style building constructed in 1915 by Dietrich & Liestern Construction who built it for Commercial & Savings Bank. The building suffered from substantial damage by fire in 1923. it was subsequently repaired and it's size was doubled at the Sutter Street side. Subsequent owners were Bank of America, while later it was acquired by the Grupe Company. The building is number 80000849 of the National Historic Places Register added November 25, 1980. The City of Stockton added the building to their city register on May 13, 1985 by resolution No. 85-0306. The building is currently home of the Cort Companies.
Click to Enlarge Edward B. Condy Home - 820 N Madison St.- Built in 1893. Former home of Edward B. Condy a popular band leader, editorialized as being Stockton's John Philip Sousa,. Condy brought honor to Stockton with his celebrated musical organizations. He fashioned the legendary Stockton Boys band during 1900 and went on in 1927 to create the Stockton City band. Stockton city register # 34,112, May 9, 1977
Click to Enlarge Click to Enlarge San Joaquin County Courthouse - 222 E Weber Avenue. This site was donated to the city by Charles Weber, although his preferred location was the old Franklin school, bounded by Commerce streets, Washington, Center and Lafayette. However the Hunter Square location was more centrally situated, and also was the biggest un-built location within the city, Subsequently Weber donated the land, on a condition that the plans would include a central plaza. The slough situated on the Western part of this block was filled in to create Hunter Square, and subsequently construction began on the first courthouse in 1853 and was dedicated in 1854. The county courthouse continues to be located on the site. Added to the Stockton city register with resolution number 30,102, November 20, 1972
Click to Enlarge Cunningham Castle - Former County Jail - Built in 1893, The northeast corner of San Joaquin and Channel streets. More about Cunningham

Cunningham Castle - Former County Jail

Often called 'Cunningham's Castle,' because of it's fortress-like structure which featured turrets having conical roofs, round masonry towers, short robust columns, and stonework with a rough face in contrasting colors. A Richardsonian Romanesque design that became popular through the 1890s, while the nickname came from its medieval look during Sheriff Thomas Cunningham's term in office. Construction was started in 1891, although financial problems held up the completion until 1893. When it was completed, this three-story brick structure was designed to accommodate 75 prisoners with eight cells fashioned within a semi-circle within the first and second floors along with six cells in the basement. Additional cells held women and witnesses. With a continually expanding population, although, the jail soon was operating in excess capacity; the jail was averaging a population in excess of 400 prisoners by the later part of the 1940s. Decaying lime mortar along with complaints over inhumane conditions led up to the jailhouse being closed in 1958 and subsequently demolished in 1961. By resolution # 30,101, , the site was added to the Stockton city register November 20, 1972.
Click to Enlarge Dr. Cross House - 207 W. Acacia St - Built in 1890 in the popular Queen Anne style featuring polygonal bays and a corbelled chimney, this home was both an office plus the residence of Dr. Lester Emmett Cross. This local physician was considered to be Dean of Stockton's local medical profession and was affectionately labeled "Dr. Stork" as it was often said a child was not well born unless Dr. Cross delivered it. - Today it's a bed-and-breakfast known as the Old Victorian Inn - Stockton register #85-0597, September 23, 1985
Click to Enlarge Click to Enlarge Daguhoy Lodge #528 - 203 E. Hazelton St - Structured by Cruz Renario, October 10, 1926, subsequently chartered, February 11, 1937. Renario was elected the first worshipful master of the lodge. It was the first lodge in the country fashioned under the Ligionarios Del Trabajo of the Philippines. The lodge acquired the building December 27, 1937 and has continued to serve as the meeting place for many generations of Stockton Filipino Americans. Stockton Register #03-0104
Click to Enlarge Dunne Home - 1335 N. Hunter St - Built in 1895 for local shoe store owner Edward Dunne, this design of the home combines elements of Queen Anne, Eastlake and Stick styles. It contains an array of original stain-glass windows. as Dunne's family grew, the home was expanded, by adding wings acquired from other local structures, perhaps the reason for the home's eclectic Victorian styles. This home has often been referred to as the Stockton 'Mystery House'. Stockton register #38,208, May 11, 1981
Click to Enlarge El Dorado Elementary School - 1525 Pacific Avenue - Built in 1916 one of the greatest instances of the early part of the 20th century schools to be found in Northern California. Constructed in customized Elizabethan Tudor Architecture in a very effective approach by Stockton architects, Louis L. Stone and William J. Wright. Originally there were 14 classroom and subsequently enlarged in 1922. Community efforts resulted in preservation and placement of the building on the U.S. National historic places register 1977000335.
Click to Enlarge Click to Enlarge Elks Building - 42 N. Sutter St - Built in 1908 the (1900-24)Chicago style by Architects Salfield & Kohlberg, a five-story structure which featured a massive stained glass skylight dome originally proposed for the Elks Hall in San Francisco, however after the earthquake of 1906 t was switched to Stockton.. The Elks Benevolent Protective Order held their meetings until 1976 upon the top floor. The dome was later taken away and sold. In 1980 The upper floors received fire damage, however the lobby still features the original Elks motif mosaic floor The structure is #80004606 on the National Historic Places Register, added June 3, 1980
Click to Enlarge Emergency Hospital - 220 - 222 N. San Joaquin St - Built in 1910, the opening of the Emergency Hospital was an important milestone in Stockton’s history. Before the hospital had its own facility, a receiving hospital was located in the cellar of the neighboring county jail building. Funding for the hospital came from Elizabeth and James L. Hough to the city and county of San Joaquin in memory of Henry Harper Hewlett, Elizabeth’s father. The hospital was an up to date facility designed in the Mission Revival style with male and female wards, an operating room, preparation room, sterilizing room, private, and dental rooms. By the late 1960s the hospital could no longer provide proper services and it was closed by the City in 1968 and converted into county offices. Added to Register Mar 30, 2004 #08-0478
Click to Enlarge Click to Enlarge Engine House #3 - 19 N. Pilgrim St Built in 1908, a Romanesque revival style structure, designed by local architects Beasley and Beasley. It's the oldest firehouse in Stockton. Engine company No. 3 was stationed here from 1908 to 1956. A horse drawn American LaFrance steamer and a hose wagon were housed here until replaced in 1914 by a motor driven seagrave pump and white chemical and hose truck
Click to Enlarge Click to Enlarge California Building - 11 S. San Joaquin - Built in 1917 for the former Farmers and Merchants Bank. The building is the work of prominent San Francisco Architect George W. Kelham. With almost no exterior changes it exemplifies renaissance revival style and reflects early local interest in building skyscrapers. A granite and brick building, it's listed in the National Register of Historic Places. National register #1980000850
Click to Enlarge Federal Building - 401 N. San Joaquin St  - This building is typical of 1933 classical depression era architecture and is a product of the extensive federal construction programs of the 1930s. The lobby’s oil murals were a part of the “New Deal’s” art in public places. Aside from housing many federal agencies the building served as the sixth location of Stockton’s main post office. It is listed in the National Register of Historic Places.
Click to Enlarge First Church of Christ Scientist - 801 N. Center St - The first services were held on November 25, 1928 in this Grecian-ionic church designed by local architect Glenn Allen. The classical interior seats 1000 and features a leaded glass skylight centered in the dome, inlaid mahogany paneling and curly birch pews. Foyer details include bronze light fixtures and gold leaf accents. The Stockton Record deemed it a “Beautiful Edifice” upon completion in 1928. Added to the city register by resolution number 95-0107 on March 20, 1995
Click to Enlarge Fox California Theatre (Bob Hope Theatre) - 242 E. Main St - Built in 1930 on the former T & D Theatre site, a truly ornate mission revival Fox California with its unique tower and vaudeville Marquee reigned as Stockton’s premier movie palace. The baroque interior boasts of magnificent columns, exquisite chandeliers and extensive ornamentation. The theatre presented both movie and stage productions. The Fox is listed in the National Register of Historic Places. #1979000540
Click to Enlarge Genova Bakery - 749 N. Sierra Nevada St - Built in 1918, the bakery and store, are a link to the old country, and reflect the industry and perseverance of Italian immigrants who made great contributions to the enrichment and development of Stockton. The baker’s unique brick oven fired to "red hot" intensity twice daily since 1918 uses radiant heat to bake up to 2000 loaves of bread each day. The dough is prepared in much the same manner as in pioneer days. Added to the city register by resolution number 85-0325 on May 28, 1985
Click to Enlarge Gridley Monument - Stockton Rural Cemetery near Memory Chapel Located at the Stockton Rural Cemetery close to the Memory Chapel at Cemetery Lane & East Pine Street. This memorial was put up by Rawlins Post of the Grand Army of the Republic along with citizens of Stockton to honor Reuel Colt Gridley, for providing his services when he gathered $275,000 for the Sanitary Commission by selling and reselling a sack of flour to help Union soldiers out during the War of the Rebellion. Memorial number 801 on California's Office of Historic Preservation's Historical Landmark list #801
Click to Enlarge Henery Apartments - 121 S. Sutter St. - This French Second Empire style brick and terra cotta building features a Mansard roof, arched windows, decorative surrounds, cornices with medallions, and decorative brackets. Designed by Glen Allen, whose firm is also known for Goold and John's Tudor Flats (1924) at 938-944 North Sutter Street, Stockton Memorial Civic Auditorium (1924), First Church of Christ Scientist ( 1928), and the Jewish Community Center (1928). The building was added to the city register by resolution number 86-0294 on May 19, 1986.
Click to Enlarge Click to Enlarge Hotel Stockton - Weber & Eldorado St.- Constructed in 1910,  a prime example of mission revival architecture and was the first steel reinforced concrete building in the central valley. Construction cost of $500,000 was financed by the Hotel Stockton company. The 200 room hotel was once the city’s finest hostelry. It first opened for business May 26, 1910 and closed in 1961.
Click to Enlarge Hurrle Weston Home - 5 E. Harding Way. Known at one time as 'The White Queen of Stockton,' Built fin 1906 for Charles J. Hurrle, Stockton Glass Works manager. Sold in 1915 to Mrs. J. D. McDougald who bought it for her daughter, Carolyn Weston and son-in-law, Paul Weston, a local farmer and the second chairman of the Stockton port commission. The home has ten rooms at one time fronted the North Street Canal, which at the time was very North Stockton. Today it's the home of Maxine's Bridal Shop. Ron Chapman said the top floor is one complete open room. It was empty at the time he got to see it, sometime in the '90's. In the basement were stacks of marble that came from the Hazelton Library on Market St. Added to the Stockton city register resolution # 29,100, June 7, 1971
Click to Enlarge Jewish Community Center - 1435 N. Madison St- Designed by Allen and Young, who are also known for the Henery Apartments (1913), Goold and John's Tudor Flats (1924) at 938-944 North Sutter Street, Stockton Memorial Civic Auditorium (1924), and the First Church of Christ Scientist (1928). The building was added to the city register by resolution number 36,741 on November 13, 1979.
Click to Enlarge John Brown Burial Site - 1100 E. Weber - at North Union Street. John Brown, Stockton resident from 1851 to 1859, is notable for his four -day ride from Los Angeles to San Francisco to warn Commodore Stockton of the attack on Los Angeles. As a result of his actions, troops were sent to secure the city, and Brown - nicknamed Juan Flaco - became known as the 'Paul Revere of California.' He is buried in the former Citizen's Cemetery near this site, which is #513 on the Office of Historic Preservation's California Historical Landmark list.
Click to Enlarge Lindsay Point - First Building Site- In August 1844, the first settlers arrived at Rancho del Campo de los Franceses. One of the company, Thomas Lindsay, built the first dwelling, a tule hut, on this site. He was later murdered by Indians and buried here by travelers. The Point was formed by the junction of McLeod's Lake and Miner's Channel. - California Historical Landmark #178
Click to Enlarge Click to Enlarge Luther Burbank School - 1120 S. Pilgrim St - Built in 1925, A modified Elizabethan Tudor building, designed by the nationally influential local architectural firm of Allen & Young. Glazed tile ornamentation enhances the façade of the 10 classroom structure which served the Stockton Unified School District for 53 years. The building was added to the city register by resolution number 35,547 on August 28, 1978.
Click to Enlarge Click to Enlarge Medico-Dental Building - 242 N. Sutter St - Designed and built by famous Stockton architects Howard Bissell, AIA, and Frank V. Mayo, FAIA. 1n 1927, The structure is an excellent example of a commercial Gothic Style skyscraper. The steel-framed building features a terraced façade most typical of eastern urban designs. The exterior finish is “Coat of Joseph” face brick, trimmed in sandstone colored terra cotta which came from Lincoln, California. Decorative detail of the terra cotta above the entrance to the building. left photo, Cornelia Hotel - Demolished to build the Medico Dental Building
Click to Enlarge Miner Levee Site - North Side of Stockton Channel between Harrison & Lincoln St - The Riverboats Delta King and Delta Queen were constructed on this Site and Dedicated on May 20, 1927. They were the last sternwheel steamboats built in California.
Click to Enlarge Moses Rodgers Home - 921 S. San Joaquin - The San Francisco-style home, with its bay window, tongue and groove siding, and wrap-around porch, was constructed for Missouri native - and African-American - Moses Rogers. Rogers was born a slave, but became a mining engineer and came to California for the Gold Rush in 1848. He quickly became known as an expert in the state, and investors went to him for advice regarding mining claims. Rogers moved his family to Stockton so that his five daughters would receive a good education, something that the schools were able to provide. The home is notable because of its architectural style, as well as the fact that it was owned by an African- American family. It is #78000763 on the National Register of Historic Places and was listed in 1978. It was added to the city register by resolution number 35,546 August 28, 1978
Newell Home - 1107 N. San Joaquin St- Located in the Magnolia Historic Preservation District. This Queen Anne style home was built for Sidney Newell, a banker for Stockton Savings Bank as well as a steamboat company executive, and his wife Anna Elizabeth (Upslone). The Samuel and Joseph Newsom design features a hipped gable roof with a corbelled chimney on the south side (with a bargeboard, pendant, and vents), turned posts, delicate woodwork, and a stained glass window in the entry. The home was added to the city register by resolution number 29,170 on July 6, 1971.
Click to Enlarge Nippon Hospital - 25 S. Commerce - Built in a Classical Revival style with gable crowns, colored brick, and classic Greek architecture, the two-story, 4864 square-foot structure was constructed in 1919 in response to the inadequate care that Japanese people received during an influenza outbreak the previous year. Named for the Japanese word for 'Japan,' the hospital featured 30 hospital rooms, a surgery suite, and an ethnic kitchen. Due to its central location within the Japanese area of Stockton, as well as racial discrimination from Chinese and non- Asians elsewhere, the hospital catered exclusively to Stockton's Japanese population of approximately 4,300 - one of the largest in the United States. The hospital incorporated in 1922, and reorganized in 1925, only to close its doors in 1930 due to financial matters. The building was later used as the Hotel Bryant until 1978, when the Stockton City Council placed it on the historical landmark list by resolution number 35,548 on August 28, 1978. As the building itself is the only remaining structure from the early Japanese community in Stockton, it was also listed on the National Register of Historic Places as #78000762 on September 18, 1978
Click to Enlarge Charles E. Owen Home - 1119 N. San Joaquin St- In the Magnolia Historic Preservation District. The two-and-a-half story Queen Anne style home was constructed for Charles Owen next to the home of the man who conveyed him the deed. Built at a cost of $10,000, it was completed in February 1890. It was sold in 1909 to William Brennan, owner of a leading livery stable. The home features a gabled roof with boxed eaves, lights, and shingles in the gables, bay windows with double-hung sashes, and wooden steps to the porch. It also has a hitching post in the front yard, one of the few left in Stockton. Owen was an accomplished musician, and had composed pieces that were published in San Francisco and Boston. The home is remarkable for its craftsmanship, as well as the quick construction timeline, remarkable for the 1890s. It was added to the city register by resolution number 34,629 on November 7, 1977
Click to Enlarge Philomathean Clubhouse - 1000 N. Hunter St - Six Stockton women met November 17, 1893 to begin a private club which they named Philomathean, which means "Lover of Learning." In 1910, members began planning a meeting place to call their own.W.E. Wood a local architect donated the plans for this rustic craftsman design featuring decorative stained glass. The building was completed in 1912
Click to Enlarge Sears Roebuck Building - 620 N. Aurora St- Originally used by the Sunset Door and Sash Co., this vernacular style structure is the oldest massive brick industrial complex still standing in Stockton. Remodeled in 1916, it became the Sears, Roebuck and Company’s only mail order distribution center in California until 1927. Sears’ extensive stock ranged from baby carriages to windmills to feeding molasses. The building was added to the city register by resolution number 86-0274 on May 12, 1986. Photo courtesy of Dan Court.
Click to Enlarge St. Agnes School and Convent - 640 N. San Joaquin St. Agnes was built as a Catholic parochial school in 1914 the facility has been successively called the St. Agnes Academy, St. Agnes High School, and San Joaquin Middle School. The adjoining building constructed in 1920 served as a convent for the Dominican sisters. Neoclassic and late beaux-arts design highlight this yellow buff brick complex, arched porch and terra cotta capped pilasters. Located in the Magnolia Historic Preservation District. The building was added to the city register by resolution number 86-0503 on August 11, 1986.
Click to Enlarge St Johns Episcopal Church and Guild Hall - 115 E. Miner St. The guild hall of this church is an outstanding example of Nordic architecture: it was completed in 1889 at a cost of $9,200. The adjacent church was erected for $10,000 and the first service was held December 18, 1892. Saint John’s and all older churches in the city received land from Stockton’s founder, Captain Charles M. Weber.
Click to Enlarge St Mary's Church - 203 E. Washington St. California’s First Archbishop, Joseph S. Alemany, laid the cornerstone July 21, 1861. The first mass was celebrated Christmas Eve of the same year. In 1870 the transept was added. The present steeple and ornate façade date from 1893. Saint Mary’s is the oldest catholic parish in the San Joaquin Valley. Stockton Historical Landmark No.1 Designated by the Stockton City Council 1971
Click to Enlarge Click to Enlarge Click to Enlarge Santa Fe Depot (Amtrak) - 735 S. San Joaquin St- Built in 1900, Santa Fe railway acquired its route from Bakersfield to Stockton from the San Francisco – San Joaquin Valley railroad known locally as the Valley road. This line, when completed in 1898 was the only railroad competing with Southern Pacific monopoly in this area. This 16 room Mission style building cost $24, 470. The building was added to the city register by resolution number 30, 103 on November 20, 1972
Click to Enlarge Sikh Temple - 1930 S. Grant St - Constructed by Sikhs, who came to the San Joaquin Valley in the early 1900s because of its similarities to the Punjab region of India, the temple was one of the first religious centers for Indians in the United States. A more modern temple was built in 1930; the original building is used as the library, and is #1039 on the Office of Historic Preservation's California Historical Landmark list.
Click to Enlarge Sperry Building - 146 W. Weber Avenue -This Victorian Commercial style building served as the offices for Sperry Flour Company, and was designed by local architect Charles Beasley; in 1917, an addition was constructed to the rear of this building, which matched the original exactly. The Sperry Building was added to the city register by resolution number 29,086 on June 1, 1971. It is #82002255 on the National Register of Historic Places, and was added in 1982 as the Sperry Office Building. Today it houses the headquarters for Stockton’s professional soccer team, the California Cougars.
Click to Enlarge Sperry Union Mill Warehouse - 445 W. Weber Ave- Constructed in the 1870s through 1897 This building is from an era when Stockton was a major milling and international shipping center for grain. Built in stages, it was first occupied by the Granger co-operative union as one of its Eureka Warehouses. The present size was reached after three expansions by the Sperry Flour Company to serve the adjacent flour mill. It is listed in the National Register of Historic Places #1979000541
Click to Enlarge Click to Enlarge Click to Enlarge Stockton Memorial Civic Auditorium - 525 N. Center St - Built 1924-1925. A classic revival style building designed by local architects Glenn Allen, Ivan C. Satterlee and W. J. Wright features sculpted panels over the seven front entrances. A floor of California marble and an art glass skylight in the center of the flat dome. Stocktonians conducted bond drives to fund construction of the memorial auditorium to honor those who gave their lives while serving in the armed forces in World War I.
Click to Enlarge Stockton Savings & Loan - 301 E. Main St - A Classic Revival style building, designed by San Francisco architects Myers and Ward, and featured Stockton's first revolving door as well as a marble interior. Known as 'Stockton's first skyscraper,' this was the third building to serve as headquarters for Stockton Savings & Loan (now Bank of Stockton). The top two floors have always been home to the Yosemite Club, the oldest private club in California. The building is #78000764 on the National Register of Historic Places and was added in 1978. The building was added to the city register by resolution number 34,630 on November 7, 1977. The building is currently vacant.
Click to Enlarge Click to Enlarge Street Car Barns and Offices - 2850 N. California St- Built in 1907 The first Stockton built 10 horsepower electric streetcars were introduced in 1892 to replace horse and mule drawn trolleys used since 1875. The Stockton Electric Railroad Co. built the Streetcar Barns and Office Complex in 1907 and utilized this facility until 1941 after which gasoline powered motor coaches served as the primary mode of public transportation. The building was added to the city register by resolution number 85-0307 on May 13, 1985.
Click to Enlarge Superintendent's Home - 521 E. Acacia St. - Built in 1900 for the Stockton State Hospital at a cost of $5,800. This 16 room home is an excellent example of a southern mansion. The state hospital was established in 1853 as the first publicly supported facility for the mentally ill in the west. Located in the Magnolia Historic Preservation District. National Register of Historic Places The home was added to the city register by resolution number 29,086 on June 1, 1971
Click to Enlarge Swett-Moreing Home - 143 W. Acacia St - The California Eastlake style (combination of Queen Anne and Eastlake) home was constructed for William Swett in 1883 by San Francisco architects Samuel and Joseph Newsom. Swett was a staff member at the Stockton Mail newspaper, and his family lived in the home until it was sold in 1891. Cyrus Moering Sr., a rancher and contractor, purchased the home 1898 and lived there until his death in 1911. Moering headed the firm of Cyrus Moreing & Sons, which held many of the largest construction contracts for the bond highways in San Joaquin County. Moering was also an elected councilman for the Second Ward, and owned a baseball team. The home is significant because it is one of the oldest surviving examples of the Newsoms' work, and retains an essentially original appearance. The home was added to the city register by resolution number 39,263 on July 26, 1982.
Click to Enlarge Click to Enlarge Original Temple Israel - 821 N. American St- Built in 1855 A simple clapboard siding building, it's one of Stockton’s oldest buildings and also the oldest surviving synagogue structure in California. Originally constructed near Miner Avenue and El Dorado Street it seated 200 and served surrounding counties. The building was moved to this site in 1905 and converted to apartments. Located in the Magnolia Historic Preservation District. The oldest building on the city register, the building was added to the city register by resolution number 39,264 on July 26, 1982 - Center photo, 2008, right photo 2013
Click to Enlarge Click to Enlarge Temple Israel Cemetery - East Acacia Street between North Pilgrim and North Union streets. The cemetery site was donated to the Jewish community by Captain Charles Maria Weber in 1851. The site is currently the oldest Jewish cemetery in continuous use in California and west of the Rocky Mountains, and is #765 on the Office of Historic Preservation's California Historical Landmark list - See Oldest Jewish Cemetery
Click to Enlarge Click to Enlarge Click to Enlarge Tretheway Block - 229 E. Weber St - Originally constructed as the Argonaut Hotel, with a hardware store at street level, this Queen Anne style structure includes Romanesque and Moorish elements of cast zinc floral patterns and sandstone. When constructed, the building had a taller false front parapet, which fell during the San Francisco earthquake in 1906; when the false front was reconstructed, it assumed a lower profile. The building is #82000987 on the National Register of Historic Places, and was added in 1982 as the Tretheway Block. The structure was added to the city register by resolution number 38,554 on September 8, 1981.
Click to Enlarge Wagner Leather Co. Engine Room - 122 E. Oak St- Built in 1871, the building once housed the engine and boiler rooms of the Wagner Leather Company operators of the Pacific Tannery from 1856-1926. This tannery occupied an entire block and for years was the only tannery in the San Joaquin Valley and one of the largest in the west. Products including harness and sole leather were shipped throughout the pacific coast, the orient and other world markets. The structure was added to the city register by resolution number 30,809 on October 15, 1973.
Click to Enlarge Weber Point - Confluence of Stockton Channel & McLeod Lake - 221 N. Center Street. The point is the site of a two-story adobe-and- redwood house built in 1850 by Captain Charles Maria Weber, founder and pioneer developer of Stockton. One of the first elaborate residences and landscaped gardens in the San Joaquin Valley, it was Captain Weber's home until his death in 1881. Today the 9.7-acre (39,000 m2) site is home to the Weber Point Event Center, which includes the Great Circle, Plaza, step Amphitheater, children's play area, an interactive water feature, Point Amphitheater, main stage, and waterfront promenade. The site was added to the city register by resolution number 30,304 on March 12, 1973, and is #165 on the Office of Historic Preservation's California Historical Landmark list.
Click to Enlarge Weber Primary School - 55 W. Flora St- This school was named after Capt. Charles M. Weber, founder of Stockton, who donated land for many early schools. Construction cost $12,888. May 12, 1873 was dedication day and classes have continued to date. The red brick architecture is representative of the type of building once prevalent throughout Stockton that inspired a long forgotten nickname “the brick city.” It's the oldest brick building in the city retaining its original appearance. Old Weber Elementary School in the Magnolia Historic Preservation District. The building was added to the city register by resolution number 29,100 on June 7, 1971. It is #73000445 on the National Register of Historic Places, and was added as the Old Weber School in 1973.
Click to Enlarge Wong House - 704 N. Stockton St.- Built in 1924, This classical Neo-Georgian style residence was designed by architect Peter L. Sala for Wong Kee Quen. Born in China, Wong made his fortune in New York City and in 1912 started the operation of several local gambling establishments. He was a principal partner in the construction of the elegant Lincoln Hotel, formed a Chinese language school and was a Wong family association director. The home was added to the city register by resolution number 38,553 on September 8, 1981.

More about Wong_Gew Click to Enlarge Wong K. Gew Mansion - 345 W. Clay- Designed by architect Peter Sala and constructed in a Classical Neo-Georgian style (1900-24) by Losekann & Clowdsley, the home was one of the most costly in Stockton by the time it was completed in 1921.

Suggested Books Related to Stockton

More Stockton Community History

Stockton's Miracle Mile
Stockton's Pacific Avenue
Stockton's Wilson Way
Stockton Articles Index

External links